25Jul
rlevitow July 25, 2014 No Comments

This July on WWB: New Translations of Sindhi Folktales

This July on WWB: New Translations of Sindhi Folktales

Sindhi Folktales

This July on WWB, explore the fascinating world of traditional Sindhi folktales in three compelling new translations by Musharraf Ali Farooqi. Read along as we peek into a world of conniving sparrows,wily jackals, and spell-casting storks

Also, make sure to read Musharraf Ali Farooqi's introduction to the folk literature of Sindh over here

News

Save the Date for the Words without Borders Gala 
October 28, 2014, 6:30 PM. At Tribeca Three Sixty.
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Editorial Internship

Looking to get involved? Words without Borders is looking for  an editorial intern. Find more details over here.

 

Blog

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Camila Santos reviews Dorothy Tse's Snow and Shadow 

Dorothy Tse’s third book, Snow

and Shadow, is a collection of surreal stories set in a fantastical version of Hong Kong. more>>>

Lucy Renner Jones reviews Andrei Bitov's The Symmetry Teacher 

Andrei Bitov describes his book The Symmetry Teacher as a “novel-echo,” a palimpsest of a text which, as he explains in his preface, is his Russian “translation” of an obscure and untraceable English novel by a writer called A. Tired-Boffin. more>>>

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