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WWB Logo                               October October 2009
 
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The Fall of the Berlin Wall
From the WWB Blog
Bookshelf: New Reviews
Upcoming Events
Call for Manuscripts
 
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September 2009 Cover
October 2009: International Reporting

  

From Pol Pot's Smile, by Peter Fröberg Idling, translated from the Swedish by Silvester Mazzarella

Dear Torturer by Erwin Koch, translated from the German by John K. Cox

From Towers of Stone, by Wojciech Jagielski, translated from the Polish by Soren Gauger

Rwanda: The Flame of Hope, by Abdourahman A. Waberi, 
translated from the French by Nicole Ball and David Ball

When Chaos Came to Salzburg by Karl-Markus Gauss, translated from the German by John K. Cox

 

A Revolutionary Tradition: Shoars in Iranian Street Politics by Elham Gheytanchi

The Front, by Gébé, 
translated from the French by Edward Gauvin

From The Burning of the Chiado, by François Vallejo, translated from the French by Edward Gauvin

From Sandokan, by Nanni Balestrini, translated from the Italian by Antony Shugaar


Wall Logo

Words without Borders is hosting its first annual benefit onNovember 9, 2009, to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall and celebrate the release of The Wall in my Head. The evening will feature a dinner of Eastern and Central European cuisine, readings from the anthology by Paul Auster, Siri Hustvedt, andPeter Schneider, and music DJed by Dean Wareham. The fundraiser is a great way to meet staff and other supporters, while helping WWB fulfill its mission.  

 
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Dear Friends, 
 
I know we've written about our projects surrounding the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall before, but we are very excited and you'll have to forgive me for bringing the topic up one last time. 
 
I was twelve when the Berlin Wall fell and at that time I knew it only to be a momentous occasion, the fall of a monolithic enemy called Communism. I gained insight into different political ideologies over the years, but it wasn't until I read the galley for The Wall in My Head, that I was given a real, complex picture of that period. Through The Wall in My Head I gained new perspectives on dictatorial governments and secret police but also on the lives of people, lives that would be upended and changed for both better and worse in the years after the fall of the Iron Curtain. 
 
In addition to the anthology, we're commemorating the anniversary onNovember 9, 2009, with our first annual fundraiser–more on that below. 
 
On November 10, we'll have a reading and discussion with four writers–from the anthology and our upcoming November issue on German writing after 1989–who have lived most of their lives in post-communist Europe. The readers will be Dorota Maslowska (Poland), the author of Snow White and Russian Red, and winner of the Nike prize; Dan Sociu (Romania), the author of UrbancholiaMasha Gessen (Russia), author of Ester and Ruzya: How my Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace; and Kathrin Aehnlich(Germany), author of Alle Sterben, auch Die Löffelstöre. The event will be moderated by Eliot Borenstein, Chair of the Department of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University, and the author ofOverkill: Sex and Violence in Contemporary Russian Popular Culture. This event will take place at Idlewild Books, at 12 W. 19th Street in New York City.  It is free and open to the public.
 
I'd like to thank Open Letter Books, the Polish Cultural Institute in New York, the Romanian Cultural Institute New York, the German Book Office, the Goethe-Institut New York, and Idlewild Books for helping us put on this great event.  
 
I hope to see you there. 
 
Best,
Joshua  
Managing Director

From the WWB Blog RSS


Poeboes Podcast-Aamer Hussein 
by Andre Naffis
16 October 2009

tinycoverThis month, Andre Naffis brings us the third installment in his Poeboes series of podcasts for the WWB blog. In his latest dispatch. Andre speaks to writer Aamir Hussein.

Aamer Hussein (1955- ), was born in Karachi, Pakistan and moved to London at the age of 15. He writes short stories and novellas, studied at the School of African and Oriental Studies (SOAS, London) and is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Southampton. Fluent in Urdu, Italian and French he has written on Middle and Far Eastern literatures in translation and Modern South Asian Literature. [More]

A Chain of Voices by André Brink 
by Geoff Wisner
15 October 2009

Chain of Voices CoverAlthough André Brink is one of South Africa's leading Afrikaans-language writers, and although his work has appeared in English, at least one article has questioned whether we can categorize those works as African literature in translation.

"By his own admission Brink remains, in essence, an Afrikaner, but his recent novels are not "translated." Brink maintains that he produces the novels in both languages more or less simultaneously, starting out in Afrikaans, but completing the first "final" draft in English. However, Brink is far more idiomatic and comfortable in Afrikaans, and his English versions sometimes suffer from a certain rigidity of style." [More]

From the Magazine 
by David Varno
14 October 2009
This week, we are highlighting an excerpt from Towers of Stone, by Wojciech Jagielski, translated from the Polish by Soren Gauger. The book is forthcoming this month from Seven Stories Press, and is a closely-told narrative that seeks to explain the wars in Chechnya through two men.

The section we've extracted deals with the plight of Chechens stranded on a train that makes a months-long stop in the middle of the steppes. It's a seemingly brief episode, with penetrating observations about the consequences of this isolation and the effect it has on people and families. [More]

Dispatches: African Memoirs 
by Geoff Wisner
9 October 2009

tinycoverDear reader: I need your help.
Lately I've been reading a lot of African memoirs: books like Echoes of an Autobiography by Naguib Mahfouz, An African in Greenland by Tété-Michel Kpomassie, Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar by Emily Ruete, and Return to Childhood by Leila Abouzeid.

For a project I'm working on, I would love to get your recommendations of the best African memoirs you know about. They may be written in any language, but they should be the work of someone (of any ethnic group) who grew up on the continent.[More]

More from the blog. . .

Bookshelf 
New Reviews 


Stasiuk-Fado

Fado
by Andrzej Stasiuk
Translated from the Polish by Bill Johnston 
Dalkey Archive Press, 2009

Reviewed by Bob Buckeye
The Other Europe no longer exists, its past no more than a memory, its life marginalized in the new world of runaway capitalism. more>>>

                  

More from the Bookshelf. . .
 

Upcoming Events

The Wall in Our Heads: The 2009 Words without Borders Fundraiser

Monday, November 9, 2009 at the Bohemian National Hall, 321 East 73rd Street, New York, NY 10021

To support Words without Borders in bringing literary voices from around the world into English, we will be hosting a fundraiser in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall and in celebration of the release of our newest anthology, The Wall in My HeadPaul Holdengräber, Director of Public Programs at the NYPL, will host a program of readings by Paul AusterSiri Hustvedt, and Peter Schneider. After a Central and Eastern European dinner,Dean Wareham (musician, and former frontman of the bands Galaxie 500 and Luna) will DJ. For details and tickets click here.

The Wall in my Head Reading and Q&A
Idlewild Books, 12 W. 19th Street, New York, NY
November 10, 2009 7 p.m.

Words without Borders will host a short reading followed by a discussion and Q&A, featuring  a group of writers from its new anthology The Wall in My Head and from its November issue on German writing from the years after 1989. The readers will includeDorota Maslowska (Poland), the author of Snow White and Russian Red, and winner of the Nike prize; Dan Sociu (Romania), the author of UrbancholiaMasha Gessen (Russia), author of Ester and Ruzya: How my Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace; and Kathrin Aehnlich (Germany), author of Alle Sterben, auch Die Löffelstöre. The event will be moderated by Eliot Borenstein, Chair of the Department of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University, and the author of Overkill: Sex and Violence in Contemporary Russian Popular Culture. The panelists will discuss their contributions to the WWB anthology and issue, the relevance of the events of 1989 to today's world, the role of literature and culture in bringing down the Iron Curtain, and what the fall of the Wall has meant for writers in the former Eastern Bloc.

This event is cosponsored by Open Letter Books, the Polish Cultural Institute in New York, the Romanian Cultural Institute New York, the German Book Office, and the Goethe-Institut New York.

 

 

Call for Manuscripts

Hemispheres magazine, the inflight publication of United Airlines, has partnered with Words without Borders to offer our readers a taste of world literature. We are currently looking for translated short stories of approximately 500 words in length for our monthly fiction page. Due to our readership, we cannot print stories with sexual themes, violence, disturbing scenes or obscenities. Nor can we appear to promote a particular religious or political point of view. Stories will be published in English. Submit translations to hemispheres@wordswithoutborders.org.

 

 
 
 
Words Without Borders | P.O. Box 1658 | New York | NY | 10276

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